Song of a Man Who Has Come Through

by D. H. Lawrence


Original Language English

Not I, not I, but the wind that blows through me!
A fine wind is blowing the new direction of Time.
If only I let it bear me, carry me, if only it carry me!
If only I am sensitive, subtle, oh, delicate, a winged gift!
If only, most lovely of all, I yield myself and am borrowed
By the fine, fine, wind that takes its course through the chaos of the world
Like a fine, an exquisite chisel, a wedge-blade inserted;
If only I am keen and hard like the sheer tip of a wedge
Driven by invisible blows,
The rock will split, we shall come at the wonder, we shall find the Hesperides.

Oh, for the wonder that bubbles into my soul,
I would be a good fountain, a good well-head,
Would blur no whisper, spoil no expression.

What is the knocking?
What is the knocking at the door in the night?
It is somebody wants to do us harm.

No, no, it is the three strange angels.
Admit them, admit them.

-- from The Complete Poems of D. H. Lawrence, by D. H. Lawrence

<<Previous Poem | More Poems by D. H. Lawrence |


/ Photo by AleBonvini /


View All Poems by D. H. Lawrence

Commentary by Ivan M. Granger

I won't say much. It's a quiet Monday morning, a time for few words and just a taste of wonder...

Not I, not I, but the wind that blows through me!

I love this opening line. Have you ever noticed how wearying personal will is? Eventually everything feels like a dead effort. But when we learn the magician's trick of yielding, of letting the currents of life flow through us, delight pours through us with such surprising ease and actions form into unexpected success.

Oh, for the wonder that bubbles into my soul,
I would be a good fountain, a good well-head,
Would blur no whisper, spoil no expression.


What is the reference to the Hesperides and the "three strange angels?"

The Hesperides are three nymphs who tend a sacred garden at the edge of the world in the West. Their garden has a tree that produces magical golden apples of immortality. The three nymphs are usually associated with night, the mystery and magic of night. They embody all that the imagination envisions at the precipice of existence, the edge of the world, the edge of the night, the edge of life and death. It would take a heroic journey just to reach their garden, but it might open us to wonders.

The chisel image might seem abrupt and rather brittle. Lawrence could be representing the cutting intellect, or more broadly it could represent discernment. It could represent the necessity of separating the essential from the non-essential. Or we could see it as representing the fierce will needed to become enough of an individual to make such a journey.

And if you hear someone knocking, don't fear harm. Peep through the keyhole. It might just be three strangers in angel shape... and bearing a golden apple.

Admit them, admit them.

Carried by the course of the wind, we find we have come through...

Have a beautiful day!



Recommended Books: D. H. Lawrence

The Complete Poems of D. H. Lawrence Birds, Beasts and Flowers: Poems The Selected Poems of D. H. Lawrence Acts of Attention: The Poems of D. H. Lawrence Self & Sequence: The Poetry of D. H. Lawrence
More Books >>





Song of a Man Who