Aedh Wishes for the Cloths of Heaven

by William Butler Yeats


Original Language English

Had I the heavens' embroidered cloths,
Enwrought with golden and silver light,
The blue and the dim and the dark cloths
Of night and light and the half light,
I would spread the cloths under your feet:
But I, being poor, have only my dreams;
I have spread my dreams under your feet;
Tread softly because you tread on my dreams.

-- from The Collected Poems of W. B. Yeats, by William Butler Yeats

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Commentary by Ivan M. Granger

Tread softly because you tread on my dreams.

I had heard this line long before I discovered it was from a poem by Yeats -- this poem.

Isn't that a wonderfully evocative line? So vulnerable, yet as wide open as the world of dreams. The statement invites us to be gentle and to be aware, for who knows what has been laid before us and with what care?

Go back and reread the entire poem. Read it aloud.

Notice how it feels like it rhymes, but it doesn't actually rhyme. The poet instead is repeating words at the end of his lines: cloths... light... cloths... light.

Had I the heavens' embroidered cloths,
Enwrought with golden and silver light,
The blue and the dim and the dark cloths
Of night and light and the half light,


But we get that powerful alliteration in the fourth line: night... light... half light. It is simple, almost a child's rhyme, but it has impact. It is more like a chant, as if the poet is casting a spell on the child's mind within us.

And again, he repeats the ending phrases: under your feet... my dreams... under your feet... my dreams.

I would spread the cloths under your feet:
But I, being poor, have only my dreams;
I have spread my dreams under your feet;
Tread softly because you tread on my dreams.


With that we are witness to magic, sealed with a child's singsong repetition. A healing spell that breaks the heart with such vulnerability, and heals it again with hope and the heavens.

May as well chant it again.

I have spread my dreams under your feet;
Tread softly because you tread on my dreams.



Recommended Books: William Butler Yeats

The Oxford Book of Mystical Verse Holy Fire: Nine Visionary Poets and the Quest for Enlightenment The Collected Poems of W. B. Yeats Byzantium The Secret Rose
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Aedh Wishes for the