The Divine Image

by William Blake


Original Language English

To Mercy, Pity, Peace and Love
All pray in their distress;
And to these virtues of delight
Return their thankfulness.

For Mercy, Pity, Peace and Love
Is God, our Father dear,
And Mercy, Pity, Peace and Love
Is man, His child and care.

For Mercy has a human heart,
Pity a human face,
And Love, the human form divine,
And Peace, the human dress.

Then every man, of every clime,
That prays in his distress,
Prays to the human form divine,
Love, Mercy, Pity and Peace.

And all must love the human form,
In heathen, Turk or Jew;
Where Mercy, Love, and Pity dwell
There God is dwelling too.

-- from Music of the Sky: An Anthology of Spiritual Poetry, Edited by Patrick Laude / Edited by Barry McDonald

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Commentary by Ivan M. Granger

This poem is from Blake's Songs of Innocence, a collection of poems addressed to children. It has an intentional sing-song quality, easy to remember.

If you're like I am, you probably cringe at that line in the final stanza referring to "heathen, Turk or Jew." The phrase sounds disparaging taken out of context. But reread what Blake is actually saying: He is using the common prejudice of the day, that white European Christians are superior to all others, and he turns it on its head. He declares that "Where Mercy, Love, and Pity dwell / There God is dwelling too."

In other words, Blake is offering a truly universal vision of God that transcends religious, racial, and cultural boundaries. God isn't limited to specific dogmas. God doesn't favor one skin color or one national flag. God dwells where the human heart in fruition has made a home for "Love, Mercy, Pity, and Peace."

Where there is love, where there is mercy and compassion and empathy, where there is deep peace -- that is where God is found among people, regardless of who those people are or by what name they call God.

And all must love the human form,
In heathen, Turk or Jew;
Where Mercy, Love, and Pity dwell
There God is dwelling too.


If more poems like this were read, think how different the world would be.



Recommended Books: William Blake

The Longing in Between: Sacred Poetry from Around the World (A Poetry Chaikhana Anthology)
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The Oxford Book of Mystical Verse
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The Complete Illuminated Books
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Holy Fire: Nine Visionary Poets and the Quest for Enlightenment
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William Blake: The Complete Poems
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The Divine Image